The Future of Live Music


People who are deaf or hard of hearing can now enjoy concerts and music festivals the same way hearing people do. Interpreters like Amber Galloway-Gallego and Matt Maxey are changing the way deaf audience members experience live music. They use their entire body and facial expressions to communicate not only the lyrics but the volume and emotion going into the songs. They also are using their bodies to represent bass drops and using slang signage, especially for hip hop music. To learn more about how concert experiences are changing for the deaf community, please visit: http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/music/ct-ent-asl-interpreters-lolla-0803-story.html

Chapel Hill Schools of Magical Arts!


We were so glad to see so many of you at our annual Halloween party! Students got to take classes such as Defense Against the Dark Arts (Magically Musically Dueling), Divination (Reading Signs and Time Signatures) and Orchestra (Our Instrument Petting Zoo)! Students also got to enjoy treats and goodies! We hope everyone who attended had as much fun as we did!

Welcome Christian Sharp!


We are so happy to welcome Christian Sharp to the Chapel Hill School of Musical Arts! When he was 11, Christian began playing the drums. He then learned upright bass, electric bass, and piano. Christian graduated from North Carolina Central University in 2014 with a Jazz Performance degree. For the past 7 years he has been teaching genres of gospel, jazz and classical.

Musicians Have Superior Memories!


It’s hard to overstate the importance of “working memory“—the ability to retain information even as you process it. For a new fact to have an impact, you need to be able to hold onto it as you consider how it confirms, contradicts, or modifies your previous beliefs.

If your ability to analyze situations and solve problems suggests your working memory is particularly sharp, you might want to thank your music teacher—or the parent who pushed you to learn an instrument.

new meta-study concludes musicians tend to have stronger short-term and working-memory skills than their non-musical counterparts. The research, published in the online journal PLoS One, finds they also appear to have a small advantage in terms of long-term memory.

Read the whole article here!

GROUP WEEK: October 15 – 21


Still not registered?  Speak with your teacher or contact our reception desk at info@chsma.com to select your group!  Please note that there are no regularly scheduled MUSIC LESSONS during this week.  Teachers may, however, schedule make-up lessons during this time.  ACTING CLASS continues on its regular schedule.